Read this essay on Compare/Contrast Buddhism and Hinduism

the differences between Hinduism and Buddhism are pronounced.

Prior to his enlightenment, the Buddha was brought up in a traditional Hindu family. Before finding his own path, he went to Hindu gurus to find an answer to the problem of suffering. He followed the meditation techniques and ascetic practices as prescribed by the Hindu scriptures and followed by the Hindu yogis of his time. It is said that after becoming the Buddha, he showed special consideration to the higher caste Hindus especially the Brahmins (priests) and Kshatriyas (warriors). He exhorted his disciples to treat especially Brahmins with respect and consideration because of their spiritual bent of mind and inner progress achieved during their previous births. It is said that certain categories of Brahmins had free access to the Buddha and that some of the Brahmin ascetics were admitted into the monastic discipline without being subjected to the rigors of probation which was other wise compulsory for all classes of people. The Buddha converted many Brahmins to Buddhism and consider their involvement a sure sign of progress and popularity of his fledgling movement. Much later, we find a similar echo of sentiment in the inscriptions of King Ashoka where he exhorted the people of his empire to show due respect to the Brahmins.

During the 1800s comparative religion scholars increasingly recognized Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism as the most significant "world religions." Even today, these are considered the "Big Five" and are the religions most likely to be covered in world religion books.

Both Hinduism and Buddhism accept and believe that there is one creator
spirit. Each of them recognizes Brahma or a version of Brahma as the creator
spirit. Though they also recognize other gods, Brahma is the ultimate god. All
praise goes to him, no matter which god you are praising. This is a significant
similarity between the two religions.
The two religions of Hinduism and Buddhism believe in the process of
reincarnation. Reincarnation is being reborn again with one soul. Inside this
belief, they also believe that your deeds, or activities, during your life will
determine where you will end up. If you have lived a good life, you will be
rewarded by another good life, or you might be allowed finally to rejoin with
Brahma. If you’ve led a bad life, you will remain on earth longer, and most
likely have a bad life when you are reborn.
Another similarity is that both Hinduism and Buddhism are very kind to
animals. They believe every living creature has a soul, and through
reincarnation, you might one day end up as one. Many Hindus and Buddhists are vegetarians of one sort or another (although some do eat meat).

The relationship between Hinduism and Buddhism is comparable to the one between Judaism ..

Even fairly contemporary and progressive writers have a "youth cut-off" requirement for their listings of major world religions. Many writers will classify newer movements as NRMs ("New Religious Movements"), and reserve the label of "world religion" for "long established" religions. (Given the content of these lists, one must assume "long established" means "at least as old as the Babi & Baha'i faiths.") This is a valid criterion, although for the most part we are not using it here. Many of the movements that seem like distinct new religions may die out within a few generations. Many of the most recent movements, such as Seicho-No-Ie, Ananaikyo, Ch'ondogyo and other Asian new religious movements are overtly syncretistic or universalist, similar in some ways to but originating many years later than the Baha'i faith. Other new religious movements of this century have primarily remained within established world religions, such as new Buddhist (Western Buddhist Order), Hindu (Hare Krishna), Muslim (Nation of Islam), Jewish (Reconstructionism), and Christian (Pentecostalism, neo-Evangelicalism, Calvary Chapel) movements and denominations. Other new religious movements of the 20th century, especially recently, have been new formulations of long-dormant faiths, such as Neo-Pagan and neo-Shamanist groups. Scientology, is one of the few movements of the 20th century that has grown large enough and escaped its predecessor religious matrix thoroughly enough to be considered a distinct world religion. Even its oft-criticized differences lend credence to the notion that it is truly a unique, new religion, and not a part of Hinduism, Buddhism or some other faith.

Compare and Contrast Buddhism,Hinduism & Christianity …

Apart from some similarities, there is a main difference between Hindu and Buddhist meditative practices, although they share a common history and geographical influence. In Buddhist meditation and contemplative practices, the focus or the emphasis is mainly upon the Not-self, which in Buddhist parlance means anything other than the Self. It includes the mind, the body, the world and all the objects in them such as thoughts, feelings, emotions, images, objects, etc., which we experience through our mind and senses. According to Buddhism, the not-Self is just a temporary formation. It exists both externally and internally. By knowing it and dissolving it from within, one can reach Nirvana.

Similarities and Differences Between Buddhism and Hinduism

Hinduism and Buddhism also have several smaller differences. The area of
greatest concentration for Hinduism is India. India is where Buddhism originated,
but Hinduism eventually was a more appealing religion and it died out. Buddhism
is found mostly in East Asia, inside China and Mongolia. These areas prefer
having many, many small gods, as opposed to the Hindus only having three major
ones and then smaller, less important gods. Buddhism was founded by Siddhartha
Gautama, or the Buddha. Hinduism was started gradually; no one knows for sure
who founded it; most likely, it was many people. Both practice meditation, but
they practice it in different forms. A Hindu will meditate obtaining inner peace
through the chakras of the body. Once all of the centers, chakras, have been
balanced, a white light is said to be above the person’s head, and they are
enlightened. Buddhists meditate similarity, but have different variations of how
it is preformed. Their main goal is to end suffering.

Despite the fundamental differences between both the religions, Hinduism and Buddhism influenced each other in many ways. The Buddhist notion of non-injury and compassion toward all living beings took deep roots in the Indian soil, while Mahayana Buddhism took cue from the traditional Indian methods of devotional worship. Buddhism influenced the growth and development of Indian art and architecture and contributed richly to the practice of breathing and meditation in attaining mindfulness and higher states of consciousness. The Hindu tantra influenced the origin and evolution of Vajrayana Buddhism.

Transcript of Compare and Contrast Buddhism,Hinduism & Christianity

There are many differences between Buddhism and Hinduism.

"The more I study Hinduism and Buddhism, the more I realize how similar they are except for the fundamental differences. Both were born in the womb of the same Mother. Both grew in the light of the same wisdom. Both understood the implications of death and the need for a permanent solution. For example the deity of Death who is holding the wheel of existence in this Buddhist painting (of Kalachakra) is the same god of Death who is mentioned in the Upanishads and who manifests before Arjuna in the Bhagavadgita. He is also Rudra and Bhairava, and Mara and Yama. This image of Death, holding the wheel of existence in his Hands and between His teeth with fierce eyes and a terrible form, symbolizes mortality of life and the fact that in the end Death consumes us all." Jayaram V


Despite the fundamental differences between both religions, Hinduism and Buddhism influenced each other in many ways.

There are then based on this common foundation three main religions, Brahmanism, Buddhism and Jainism. Of the second, a great and universal faith, it has been said that, with each fresh acquirement of knowledge, it seems more difficult to separate it from the Hinduism out of which it emerged and into which (in Northern Buddhism) it relapsed. This is of course not to say that there are no differences between the two, but that they share in certain general and common principles as their base. Brahmanism, of which the Shakta doctrine and practice is a particular form, accepts Veda as its ultimate authority. Sir John Woodroffe