Shakespeare's Macbeth essay, summary, quotes and …

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The Three Witches' prophecy of Banquo's sons becoming kings has not been thwarted by Macbeth...

People have had lots of fun trying to figure out who the ThirdMurderer really is. It's evidently somebody who knows Banquo andFleance. The usual suspects include Macbeth, Lady Macbeth,or a servant or thane. All these people are supposed to showup momentarily at Macbeth's dinner party, without bloodstains.

Macbeth deals with the fictionalancestors of the Stuart line (Banquo, Fleance) and presents Banquomore favorably than did the play's sources. (In Holinshed,Banquo is Macbeth's active accomplice.) The procession of kingsends with a mirror (probably held by Banquo rather thananother king, as in some notes.)James could see himself, thus becoming part of the action. Macbethsays he sees more kings afterwards. Shakespeare has turned thenature spirits of his sources into witches for thewitch-hunting king's enjoyment.

As soon as Macbeth thinks of murdering Duncan, he says to Banquo, "Let's talk about this confidentially."This happens again before the dagger scene. However, Shakespeare's Banquo onlybecomes Macbeth's accomplice by his acquiescence afterwards.

-- Richard Armouron MacbethI hope you like Macbeth, and that I've been of some help.

Macbeth meets King Duncan, thanking him for his new title. The also loyal Banquo receives nothing. King Duncan remarks how he completely trusted the previous Thane of Cawdor.

A list of all the characters in Macbeth

A guilt-ridden Macbeth wrestles with his conscience, certain that he should not kill King Duncan yet guiltily having to remind himself of all the reasons why it would be wrong. Macbeth decides against murdering his King but Lady Macbeth belittles him for not being able to murder, threatening to take away her love for him if he does not. This threat wins Macbeth over and Lady Macbeth outlines her plan to kill King Duncan in his sleep while he is a guest at their castle.

Macbeth Essay at Absolute Shakespeare

Macbeth now first questions Banquo's on his feelings about his descendants becoming kings and then starts thinking of killing King Duncan to make prophecy fact but later hopes fate alone will spare him the need to kill...

Banquo and son Fleance arrive at Macbeth's castle. Banquo is troubled by the Three Witches' prophecy and tells Macbeth this. Macbeth pretends not to take the Three Witches seriously.

Lady Macbeth tells her husband a little water will wash away their guilt and the two retire to their bedroom when knocking is later heard...

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Banquo's questions are those of natural curiosity,—such as a girl would put after hearing a gipsy tell her school-fellow's fortune;—all perfectly general, or rather planless. But Macbeth, lost in thought, raises himself to speech only by the Witches being about to depart:—


Shakespeare's Macbeth is easily mastered using our Shakespeare's Macbeth essay, summary, quotes and character analysis.

The style and rhythm of the Captain's speeches in the. second scene should be illustrated by reference to the interlude in Hamlet, in which the epic is substituted for the tragic, in order to make the latter be felt as the real-life diction. In Macbeth, the poet's object was to raise the mind at once to the high tragic tone, that the audience might be ready for the precipitate consummation of guilt in the early part of the play. The true reason for the first appearance of the Witches is to strike the key-note of the character of the whole drama, as is proved by their reappearance in the third scene, after such an order of the king's as establishes their supernatural power of informa-tion. I say information,—for so it only is as to Glamis and Cawdor; the 'king hereafter' was still contingent,— still in Macbeth's moral will; although, if he should yield to the temptation, and thus forfeit his free agency, the link of cause and effect more physico would then commence. I need not say, that the general idea is all that can be required from the poet,—not a scholastic logical consistency in all the parts so as to meet metaphysical objectors. But O! how truly Shakspearian is the opening of Macbeth's character given in the unpossessedness of Banquo's mind, wholly present to the present object,— an unsullied, unscarified mirror!—And how strictly true to nature it is, that Banquo, and not Macbeth himself, directs our notice to the effect produced on Macbeth's mind, rendered temptible by previous dalliance of the fancy with ambitious thoughts:Banquo is fearful that the Three Witches' prophecies are becoming true, questioning whether Macbeth played most foully for it, or killed King Duncan to make prophecy, fact. Learning from Banquo that King Duncan is asleep, Macbeth, alone, follows an imaginary dagger to King Duncan's bedchamber where he will kill him in his sleep... Lady Macbeth has drugged King Duncan's guards, allowing Macbeth to kill King Duncan unchallenged. Meeting with Macbeth, Macbeth continuously asks Banquo of his travel plans and those of his son. Alone, Macbeth fears that Banquo's sons will mean his dynasty will be short-lived; only he will become King of Scotland and not his sons who will be replaced by those of Banquo's lineage.